The Death Cure: James Dashner

The Death Cure “WICKED has taken everything from Thomas: his life, his memories, and now his only friends—the Gladers. But it’s finally over. The trials are complete, after one final test. What WICKED doesn’t know is that Thomas remembers far more than they think. And it’s enough to prove that he can’t believe a word of what they say. Thomas beat the Maze. He survived the Scorch. He’ll risk anything to save his friends. But the truth might be what ends it all.” ~blurb of “the death cure”

This is the third book in the Maze Runner trilogy. It was good—even heartbreaking at certain points—but for the final book in the series, it just felt a little ambiguous? It was a great read, don’t get me wrong, just as fast paced and thrilling as the first two, but I expected a few more questions to be answered—the first two were action—packed and spent very little time explaining details, and as Thomas has no memory when he arrives in the Glade, right at the beginning, this meant I was hoping for things to get a little less murky. Things continued moving fast, which is good for not dragging the book out, but not so great if you’ve left a lot of things unanswered. On the other hand, I would’ve read it no matter what, especially since the first two books were so fantastic, so if you’ve already read Maze Runner and Scorch Trials just go ahead and read the last one, too—but don’t expect too much. It’s enjoyable, but not as wonderful as it could’ve been.

*spoilers from here on* Both my favourite and my most hated part would have to be Newt’s death. I hated it, of course I hated it, it was the death of a beloved character and it broke my heart, but it was written heart-wrenchingly and it was by far the best-written part of the book. By the end of the series, I really disliked Thomas. I’m not sure why, but the general impression you get from his character is a little bit much. The dream flashbacks felt unnecessary…they served no point but to reinforce that Thomas’ parents loved him, but unless they were going to reveal that Chancellor Paige was Thomas’ mother, or something, there really wasn’t any point to these flashbacks. Also—the whole idea of the “blueprint” seemed a little far-fetched with the desperation WICKED acted with by the end. The Glade was plausible, totally believable, actually, and the Scorch was fine, too, but everything that happened after seemed too weird to be real, even in Thomas’ world. (And maybe this is just me, but I really wanted Thomas to get his memories back, because again, the sheer ambiguity of the book annoyed me a little bit. I suppose that’s the point, to make us feel as blank as the characters, but when it did it just seemed irritating that he refused to get them back.) *end spoilers*

The amount I’ve criticized this book probably makes it feel like you shouldn’t even bother reading it. Not the case—I’m just being picky. If you haven’t started the series yet, you should, simply for the fantastic first two books. If you’ve already read the first two—again, you should read this one. It’s not the conclusion I would’ve gone for, but it’s a pretty decent conclusion nonetheless.

 

Author James Dashner official web site

WIKI site of The Death Cure

WIKIA site of The Death Cure The Maze Runner: The Death Cure – Teaser Trailer

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The Maze Runner by James Dashner

“When the lift cranks open, the only thing Thomas remembers is his first name. But he’s not alone – an army of boys welcomes him to the Glade, an encampment at the centre of a terrible maze. The Gladers have no idea why they’re there, or what’s happening to the world outside. And following the arrival of a girl with a message, they must find a way out – or die.”
First off, this book is fantastic, and as the movie is coming out later this year I recommend reading it as soon as possible. It’s about this boy, Thomas, and he wakes up with no memory – he doesn’t even remember his last name, or how old he is. There are all of these boys trapped in the middle of a maze, and the walls move around every night, repeating themselves every month or so. Every evening, the walls close, and it’s practically suicide to stay out at night – there are terrible creatures called Grievers that roam the Maze after dark.

It began around two years ago, and a new boy would arrive every month – but the day after Thomas arrives, a girl called Teresa turns up, saying she’s triggered the Ending. Supplies stop coming and the sun seems to vanish, and they need to solve the maze or they’ll all die – with no supplies and no sun for crops to grow, there’s no chance of survival anymore.

I read this based off a really enthusiastic recommendation. I wasn’t expecting much – basically, I heard some fans talking to a friend of mine. My friend was saying she was still on the first book after over a month because she found it too slow. I’d seen the book around bookstores, and I didn’t have much to read, so I gave it a try. I found the first half slow, but then the book really picked up and I found myself unable to put it back down. The characters are very human, with flaws and good points, so they were pretty relatable. Chapters were varied in length, all ending on a dramatic point, which was effective – you couldn’t stop reading.

The series is a trilogy. The next two books are The Scorch Trials and The Death Cure, as well as a prequel, The Kill Order. You don’t have to have read The Maze Runner before you read Kill Order,and vice versa, although I think reading Kill Order kind of kills the suspense if you read it first – it gives away a lot. Age…well, I’d say you could read it at the age of eleven but you could also read it at the age of fourteen and you’d enjoy it either way, so the age doesn’t really matter – the book’s completely clean, which is a pleasant contrast to most teenage books you’ll find. Definitely recommend this!

Author James Dashner official web site

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